updates: Winter 2017/8

Another semester (and year) is officially in the books. Below are some highlights. This fall also saw a very slight re-org of the content here. As a result, notes on the somewhat-immediate future are now here.

  the best part of my fall '17 inbox: benchmark selfies from the GIS class

the best part of my fall '17 inbox: benchmark selfies from the GIS class

After reworking the GIS class at GSAPP, a long-time dream has come true: several different degree programs represented in the room. Officially GIS and cartographic analysis

After reworking the GIS class at GSAPP, a long-time dream has come true: several different degree programs represented in the room. Officially, GIS and cartographic analysis was used to bridge between students working toward masters (and doctoral) degrees in planning, architecture, urban design, and real estate. I couldn't be more ecstatic about that. (Given my near-religious take on GIS, I almost literally mean that.) A few highlights are up on my Teaching: GIS page.

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The Building Justice Studio in Architecture and Urban Planning at Rikers Island wrapped up another session this fall with the Justice-In-Education initiative at Columbia's Center for Justice. To the right: an awesome illustration of the studio's cumulative, collaborative curriculum, drawn by Emily Brockenbrough. I also presented some of the work at the ACSP conference in Denver during a special session on planning's engagement with mass incarceration.

Let's see. I saw Houston before Harvey and Miami after Irma. I left Atlanta as the Georgia Dome imploded. (In my "Ground-truthing GIS in America" travels, I've also seen Tomball TX and Chamblee & Doraville, GA—both taking me back to the years of mapping and research for The Buell Hypothesis.) I celebrated the biennial in Chicago, and delivered two very different talks on the same day in Montreal. Since September, I've taken almost fifteen thousand photographs, documenting and comparing a collection of morphological and environmental characteristics I won't bore you by listing here. And, still, snapping photos through airplane windows never gets old.